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Friday, January 22, 2010

Incredible Underground Residence in Switzerland (pics)


underground home designs swiss mountain house 1 Incredible Underground Residence in Switzerland
underground home designs swiss mountain house 8 Incredible Underground Residence in Switzerland
underground home designs swiss mountain house 3 Incredible Underground Residence in Switzerland
underground home designs swiss mountain house 9 Incredible Underground Residence in Switzerland

freshome.com Have you ever thought how it would be like to live in a bunker or an underground tunnel? Well, today we bring you the upgraded version of that, which is an all-equipped underground home.


Click here to see this Gallery:  Incredible Underground Residence in Switzerland (pics)
 

Burger King plans beer-selling Whopper Bar in South Beach

Aluminum bottles will keep the beer cold.



Aluminum bottles will keep the beer cold.

Gimme a Whopper, fries — and a beer.
Those words are no longer wishful thinking. Friday, Burger King (BKC) will unveil plans to sell beer and burgers at a Whopper Bar — a new BK concept to compete with casual dining restaurants — in Miami Beach's tourist-heavy South Beach. The South Beach Whopper Bar is scheduled to open in mid-February.

Don't look for beer at conventional Burger Kings. That's not in the plans. But more Whopper Bars — which offer an assortment of burgers, toppings and beer — could be on tap in tourist hot spots such as New York, Los Angeles and Las Vegas, says Chuck Fallon, president of Burger King North America.
A brewski at the new Whopper Bar — served in special aluminum bottles to keep them extra cold — fetches $4.25. Or, order beer as part of a Whopper combo and your bill will be $7.99 — roughly $2 more than the same combo meal with a fountain drink.
The unusual move comes as the restaurant industry is reeling. Restaurant operators reported lower same-store sales in November, compared with a year earlier, for the 18th-consecutive month, the National Restaurant Association reports. Nearly 65% of operators reported a same-store sales decline in November. December results were unavailable.
Burger King's Whopper Bar isn't the first fast-food chain to test alcoholic beverages domestically. Last year in Seattle, Starbucks opened "15th Avenue Coffee and Tea, inspired by Starbucks." Beyond coffee and tea, it sells regional beers and wines.
By trying to wedge into the fast-casual dining arena with Whopper Bar, Burger King is chasing the 30-and-under crowd, which is the industry's future growth, says Bradford Hudson, marketing professor at Boston University. But the move is very tricky, he says, because "Burger King means fast food."
But Linda Lipsky, a restaurant consultant, says the move makes sense. "The Burger King customer is aging, so they're just trying to grow up with the customer."
The restaurant will initially sell Anheuser-Busch and MillerCoors beers. "You can have America's favorite beers with America's favorite burger," Fallon says. More will eventually be added, he says.
But Lipsky says the chain will be challenged to train staff to legally sell and serve alcohol. "You can be an easy mark if you're not used to selling alcohol," she says.
Burger Kings in Germany and Whopper Bars in Singapore and Venezuela sell beer. But this will be the first BK brand in the USA to sell beer. (A Whopper Bar in Universal City does not sell beer.) "We're in the midst of understanding how much beer will be a part of the (sales pitch)," Fallon says.
The restaurant also will offer delivery of all items — except beer.

First Pictures of Inside Burj Khalifa: World’s Tallest Tower

Burj Khalifa, formerly known as Burj Dubai, is a skyscraper in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, and the tallest man-made structure ever built, at 828 m.

The design incorporates ideas from traditional Islamic architecture, while the open petals of a desert flower were the inspiration for the tower’s base.

Burj Khalifa will be home to 1,044 luxury apartments, 49 floors of offices and eventually a 160-room Armani-branded hotel. Around 12,000 people are expected to live and work in the tower, which is part of a 500-acre development.

Here are some of the Inside Views of this great architecture.



















100 Ways of Saying “*&%4 You”

100 Ways of Saying “Fuck You”

 by Ted
 From:  http://standardmadness.com/

We here at Standard Madness are committed to help our fellow men learn the importance of of swearing. But what do you do when you’re drink fresh pomegranate at the Ummayad mosque in Syria and someone punches you for staring at their women? Or when some drunk dude steps over your igloo in Iceland? Well, here’s a suggestion: express your anger by telling them to fuck off in their own mother tongue. So print out this handy little guide and learn, for cursing in a foreign language is just about as cool as having a girlfriend that dresses up as slave Leia to play kinky games with you.
funny-infographic

Early EVs Won't Need Many Public Charge Points, Says NYC


January 21st, 2010 New York City often startles people, and it stayed true to form in a recent analysis done by McKinsey & Company for the city's PlaNYC planning group, "Exploring Electric Vehicle Adoption in New York City." In particular, one of the report's conclusions may come as a shock to many electric-vehicle advocates: It turns out you really don't need very many public charging points to get people to use EVs. Over the next five years, the likely early adopters will simply adapt their behavior to the limitations of the EVs: Early adopters do not appear to need a high-density public charging network. While the availability of charging at retail and curbside locations may be reassuring to the average driver concerned about range limitations, the study suggests that the earliest consumers will be willing to change their driving behavior and parking location, given their strong desire to purchase EVs. Thus, a dense public charging network will not be a strong priority for early adopters. Needed: easier installation Instead, it makes more sense to help those early adopters by streamlining the process for installing charging equipment in their homes, apartment buildings, or local garages: Given the likely strong demand among early adopters and the limited short-term supply of vehicles, initial actions would be most effective if they focused on helping early adopters enter the EV market. Survey respondents ... voiced a desire to have a convenient and easy-to-understand process to install necessary charging equipment, at home or in a commercial garage. "Range anxiety" This counterintuitive conclusion flies in the face of the received wisdom, which says drivers will avoid using electric cars unless they can be sure there are public quick-charge stations available wherever they may need them, because "range anxiety" makes them nervous that they'll run out of juice and be left stranded. But at least some EV advocates and urban planners who are now sketching out local and regional networks of EV infrastructure think the report is right on target. People quickly learn their electric car's range, they say, and pick the appropriate vehicle for the day's travel. In multi-car households, many drivers will take a compact car to deliver a kid to school or commute to work. But if there's sports practice after school that requires hauling six teenagers, they'll take the family minivan instead. For "compact car," substitute "electric vehicle," and you see how it works. 100 miles enough Sure, things come up unexpectedly. But in cities and suburbs, it's very rare that short local hops suddenly change to trips of more than 100 miles--the stated range of the upcoming all-electric 2012 Nissan Leaf, to pick one example. And the "range anxiety" concern is only relevant for battery-electric vehicles; both extended-range EVs like the 2011 Chevrolet Volt and plug-in hybrids like the 2012 Toyota Prius Plug-In offer hundreds of miles of range, using their gasoline engines for longer distances. Demand exceeds supply 'til 2015 Among the report's other conclusions: A large group of early adopters will change their behavior to accommodate the limits of early electric vehicles; The number of those early adopters is greater than the likely supply of EVs until at least 2015; It won't be necessary to provide tax incentives or other subsidies to these early adopters, but they would like to be recognized; Charging electric vehicles poses no threat to the stability of the electric grid as long as it's mostly done off-peak (at night); and Collaboration among the City of New York, electric utilities, and automakers will be required to make it all happen. The full 24-page report, prepared under the auspices of the Mayor's Office of Long-Term Planning & Sustainabilityi, can be downloaded from the PlaNYC 2030 section of New York City's website. [NYC.gov]
Public Charging Station for electric cars, courtesy Mitsubishi MotorsPublic Charging Station for electric cars, courtesy Mitsubishi Motors
Enlarge Photo
New York City often startles people, and it stayed true to form in a recent analysis done by McKinsey & Company for the city's PlaNYC planning group, "Exploring Electric Vehicle Adoption in New York City."
In particular, one of the report's conclusions may come as a shock to many electric-vehicle advocates: It turns out you really don't need very many public charging points to get people to use EVs.
Over the next five years, the likely early adopters will simply adapt their behavior to the limitations of the EVs:
Early adopters do not appear to need a high-density public charging network. While the availability of charging at retail and curbside locations may be reassuring to the average driver concerned about range limitations, the study suggests that the earliest consumers will be willing to change their driving behavior and parking location, given their strong desire to purchase EVs.
Thus, a dense public charging network will not be a strong priority for early adopters.
 2012 Nissan Leaf, Electric Avenue, 2010 Detroit Auto Show2012 Nissan Leaf, Electric Avenue, 2010 Detroit Auto Show
Enlarge Photo
 Nissan LEAF Charging PortNissan LEAF Charging Port
Enlarge Photo
 Mitsubishi i-MiEV electric car at quick charging stationMitsubishi i-MiEV electric car at quick charging station
Enlarge Photo
PlaNYC: Exploring Electric Vehicle Adoption in New York City, January 2010, report coverPlaNYC: Exploring Electric Vehicle Adoption in New York City, January 2010, report cover
Enlarge Photo
Needed: easier installation
Instead, it makes more sense to help those early adopters by streamlining the process for installing charging equipment in their homes, apartment buildings, or local garages:
Given the likely strong demand among early adopters and the limited short-term supply of vehicles, initial actions would be most effective if they focused on helping early adopters enter the EV market.
Survey respondents ... voiced a desire to have a convenient and easy-to-understand process to install necessary charging equipment, at home or in a commercial garage.
"Range anxiety"
This counterintuitive conclusion flies in the face of the received wisdom, which says drivers will avoid using electric cars unless they can be sure there are public quick-charge stations available wherever they may need them, because "range anxiety" makes them nervous that they'll run out of juice and be left stranded.
But at least some EV advocates and urban planners who are now sketching out local and regional networks of EV infrastructure think the report is right on target. People quickly learn their electric car's range, they say, and pick the appropriate vehicle for the day's travel.
In multi-car households, many drivers will take a compact car to deliver a kid to school or commute to work. But if there's sports practice after school that requires hauling six teenagers, they'll take the family minivan instead.
For "compact car," substitute "electric vehicle," and you see how it works.
100 miles enough
Sure, things come up unexpectedly. But in cities and suburbs, it's very rare that short local hops suddenly change to trips of more than 100 miles--the stated range of the upcoming all-electric 2012 Nissan Leaf, to pick one example.
And the "range anxiety" concern is only relevant for battery-electric vehicles; both extended-range EVs like the 2011 Chevrolet Volt and plug-in hybrids like the 2012 Toyota Prius Plug-In offer hundreds of miles of range, using their gasoline engines for longer distances.
Demand exceeds supply 'til 2015
Among the report's other conclusions:
  • A large group of early adopters will change their behavior to accommodate the limits of early electric vehicles;
  • The number of those early adopters is greater than the likely supply of EVs until at least 2015;
  • It won't be necessary to provide tax incentives or other subsidies to these early adopters, but they would like to be recognized;
  • Charging electric vehicles poses no threat to the stability of the electric grid as long as it's mostly done off-peak (at night); and
  • Collaboration among the City of New York, electric utilities, and automakers will be required to make it all happen.
The full 24-page report, prepared under the auspices of the Mayor's Office of Long-Term Planning & Sustainabilityi, can be downloaded from the PlaNYC 2030 section of New York City's website.
[NYC.gov]

Space pictures taken from garden shed

An amateur stargazer has stunned astronomers around the world with his photographs of the universe – taken from his garden shed.


Amateur astronomer Peter Shah who has taken astonishing shots of the universe from his garden shed
Amateur astronomer Peter Shah who has taken astonishing shots of the universe from his garden shed Photo: WALES NEWS SERVICE
 
Peter Shah, 38, cut a hole in the roof of his wooden shed and set up his modest eight-inch telescope inside. After months of patiently waiting for the right moment he emerged with a series of striking images of the Milky Way.

His photographs of a vivid variety of star clusters light years from Earth have been compared to the images taken from the £2.5 billion Hubble space telescope.

But it cost Mr Shah just £20,000 to equip his garden shed with a telescope linked to his home computer. He said: "Most men like to potter about in their garden shed – but mine is a bit more high tech than most.

"I have fitted it with a sliding roof so I can sit in comfort and look at the heavens. I have a very modest set up but it just goes to show that a window to the universe is there for all of us – even with the smallest budgets.
"I had to be patient and take the images over a period of several months because the skies in Britain are often clouded over and you need clear conditions."

Office worker Mr Shah, who lives in a hillside bungalow at Meifod, near Welshpool, Powys, has been an avid astronomer since his mother bought him a £5 telescope when he was seven.

Images in his collection include the Monkey's head nebula, M33 Pinwheel Galaxy, Andromeda Galaxy and the Flaming Star Nebula.

The superb photos, each made up of about 30 frames, are being published in a new book entitled Mirror Image. Mr Shah’s wife Lisa has supported him through his long nights of stargazing – supplying endless cups of coffee.

His images have been brought together for the first time in a book called Mirror Image. Images from the book and other photographs can be viewed at http://www.astropix.co.uk

Coyote Found Frozen Dead In His Tracks, Literally

Have you ever asked yourself how cold it would have to get to freeze an animal dead in it’s tracks? Well if so, the answer is -28 degrees. That’s how cold it was in Silt, Colorado when this coyote froze solid right in it’s tracks.




Groovy baby! MP3 player which plays music to unborn babies

By Daily Mail Reporter




A new music system has been designed to deliver soothing tunes straight to the tender ears of the most delicate of listeners - unborn babies.
The Ritmo pregnancy sound system wraps around an expectant mother's tummy and plays music into the womb through four speakers.
Its designers say unborn babies show signs of 'reactive listening' from just 17 weeks into the pregnancy.
Ritmo speaker system for unborn babies
Early learning: The inventors say music in the womb can help a foetus's intellectual development
And they claim that playing music to a foetus can provide the 'building blocks' for future musical ability and intellectual development.
The new device, which connects to an mp3 player, is said to allow mums and babies to share 'the sensory and emotional experience of bonding through sound and music.'
Ritmo was invented by dad of two Oren Oz after his wife had struggled to play music to her unborn child during her second pregnancy.
The 34-year-old said: 'Ritmo was born out of my frustration at seeing my wife struggle to find a comfortable position that also allowed the speakers to stay still.
'It was impossible for her to be mobile while having the maximum flexibility to choose her own sound.
'None of the existing solutions on the market place seemed suitable in their design, technology and functionality.
'Ritmo was created to deliver sound safely in utero, taking into account the unique acoustic environment of the womb.'
Ritmo speaker system for unborn babies
Ritmo speaker system for unborn babies
Walkies: the Ritmo gadget is said to help mum and baby form a bond before birth
Mr Oz said he and his team of full-time parents at Nuvo Group designed the gadget with both the foetus and the comfort of the mother in mind.
The two pairs of speakers are embedded in a stretchy fabric pad that fits around the tummy and can be worn under clothing.
The system is attached to an mp3 player and the sound is split three ways - two arrays of speakers and earphones for the mum to join in.
This, says Mr Oz, creates an 'in-utero auditorium and delivers safe sound to the baby regardless of his head position inside the womb.'
The inventor, from South Carolina, USA, added: 'The key to the system is in the real-time control of the sound output to the speaker arrays.
'We are not trying to educate people to play music while pregnant - we just offer better a solution to those who already do.
'Ritmo can now provide an unparalleled bonding experience for both parent and child through music sound and voice.'
The Ritmo pregnancy sound system is on sale at www.nuvo-group.com for £80.

Bam! Bing Now Cooks Up Recipes


by Leena Rao
from: http://www.techcrunch.com/

Bing just launched a nifty new feature for any cooks out there. When you search for a food item, Bing will now show recipe results that involve the item. So if I search for macaroni, I’ll see a tab to the left of results that will show me “Macaroni Recipes.”
Recipe results are pulled from a variety of recipe websites including MyRecipes.com and Epicurious.com. Each recipe will result will show the source or name of the site, user ratings, and a measure fat and of calories. You can filter recipes by convenience, type of cuisine, occasion, ratings, course and main ingredient. Unfortunately, the recipe feature doesn’t show up for every query. I typed in macaroni and cheese as well as spaghetti and meatballs, I didn’t get the recipe results for either search term.
It’s important to note that Google doesn’t do this with recipes. With many recipe portals on the web, it can often be difficult to sift through large amounts of recipes on the web within search engines. As an avid cook who uses sites like Epicurious and Foodnetwork.com often, I am a big fan of this addition to Bing.

Information provided by CrunchBas

This EMP Cannon Stops Cars Almost Instantly

From: http://gizmodo.com/
By: Rosa Golijan, rgolijan@gizmodo.com.


We've heard of electromagnetic pulses cutting steel in milliseconds, but apparently they can also be used to stop moving cars just as fast. The cannon demonstrated in the video here is still a prototype, but it definitely seems to work.

The idea is that an electromagnetic pulse would be used to disable a car's microprocessors, chips, and whatever other electronics are keeping it running. The final "cannon" system, built by Eureka Aerospace, will apparently a bit smaller and lighter than what we see in the video—it'll be suitcase-sized and about 50 pounds—and it will "stop cars in their tracks up to 656 feet (200 m) away."


I wish they tested that cannon on a moving car, but it does just what it should by disabling the car's electrical system. Only trouble is that even once the system is perfected and in use it can still be foiled easily: By using a pre-1970s car which doesn't "rely on microprocessors." Whoops. [Flight Global via Pop Sci]


Firefox 3.6 Released

From: http://mashable.com/



After months of testing, Mozilla has finally released Firefox 3.6, the newest version of its popular browser.

The new edition of Firefox (Firefox) sports an array of features, least of which is an increase in speed — 20% faster than Firefox 3.5, according to Mozilla. It uses Gecko 1.9.2 web-rendering, which improves its load times, startup speed and stability. Javascript execution is faster and smoother as well.
We’ve talked about some of the other new features before, but our favorite has to be Personas, which lets you customize your Firefox with a single click and without a restart. There’s also autocomplete form functionality and full HTML5 support. You can check out all of the new features here.

The Firefox 3.6 beta has been in testing for several months now, but the release candidates only started coming out this month. It looks like the releases went smoothly, so Mozilla is rolling it out for everyone.
You can visit the Firefox homepage to download the newest edition of the browser.

Amy Fisher is stripping for Haitian charity

Amy Fisher once “had a sex tape stolen from her house” (that she courageously also promoted and received profits for), so seeing her nude isn’t exactly a new thing. In spite of that trauma, Fisher is going to get naked once more at a Long Island club with “part of the profits” going to Haiti. You’re the real hero, Amy Fisher.

While some philanthropists are stripping their wallets to donate for victims of the Haiti earthquake, Amy Fisher is just stripping.
The media-savvy Long Island Lolita — who’s getting naked at Scene Restaurant & Lounge in Commack, LI, today, tomorrow and Saturday — promises to donate a portion of her earnings toward the relief effort.
Fisher, a mother of three, launched her own porn site last year and embarked on a tour as a stripper for hire across the country. Thankfully, she’s not taking her act to Port-au-Prince.
Someone tell George Clooney to cancel his telethon and everyone needs to stop texting “Haiti” to 90999 because we have finally figured out a way to get all the money Haiti can possibly need. Obviously, nothing could get more funds raised for Haiti than seeing a mother of three children who already has an easily accessible porn site and who’s been nude across the country over the last year. At this point, she’d be more likely to raise money by pretending to shoot tourists in the face while they get their photo taken than she would be stripping. I’d rather look into a mirror and see my face looking like Mary Jo Buttafuoco’s after her last encounter with Amy Fisher than I would want to see Fisher’s aging body and c-section scars.
But yeah, whatever money falls out of her cooter is going to Haiti, so that’s something. Totally not a transparent stunt to appear relevant (or as relevant as a girl whose claim to fame is being underage and boning a fat Guido and who’s now stripping on Long Island can possibly be). Please accept my sarcastic clap as a token of gratitude.
[NY Post]

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