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Monday, April 25, 2011

Flying Car For Sale: Buy Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. No Kidding!

The flying car Chitty Chitty Bang Bang from the famous Dick Van Dyke film (eBay).

A car alleging to be the original hero car from Ian Fleming's Chitty Chitty Bang Bang has wound up on eBay, apparently in running condition. According to the seller, the film's production manager insisted that the hero car be a fully-functional road car, not just a mock up.

To that end, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang sports a 3.0-liter Ford V6 and automatic transmission, mounted in a one-off ladder frame. The body features a handmade aluminum hood and red and white cedar boattail rear. Unfortunately, none of Chitty's magical powers made it to the road car, meaning this thing won't fly.

The seller claims that all the brasswork on the car came from actual Edwardian-era cars, to make sure Chitty Chitty Bang Bang looked as true-to-life as possible. That sounds like a lot of work to go into a car for Hollywood, even a hero car.

The seller provides a convincing back story on the car, but there's no official documentation shown or offered. This is no-doubt a well-built car, and very well could be the original from the movie, but at a starting bid of $1,000,000, we'd need a lot of confirmation before pulling the trigger. Not that we could afford it anyway...

Razy Gogonea - Britain's Got Talent 2011 Audition - itv.com/talent

From : itv.com/talent
http://youtu.be/z62zrqaqVbY

Uploaded by on Apr 23, 2011

Britain's Got Talent: 28-year-old dancer Razy, originally from Romania, is trying out for Britain's Got Talent with quite a unique act, taking queues from the film The Matrix. With breakdancers being notorious on this show - from Tobias Mead and Aiden Davis to winner George Sampson - has Razy got something special that makes him different? See more at http://itv.com/talent

Watch Video here: http://youtu.be/z62zrqaqVbY

One man, 100,000 toothpicks, and 35 years: An incredible sculpture of San Francisco

flickr.com — The elaborate sculpture is comprised of multiple “tours” that move pingpong balls through neighborhoods, historical locations, and iconic symbols of San Francisco, all recreated with a little glue, some toothpicks, and an incredible amount of ingenuity.

CLICK HERE FOR SLIDESHOW: http://www.flickr.com/photos/tinkering_studio/sets/72157626359200567/show/

Scott Weaver's Rolling through the Bay from Learning Studio on Vimeo.



Scott Weaver's amazing piece, made with over 100,000 toothpicks over the course of 35 years, is a depiction of San Francisco, with multiple ball runs that allow you to go on "tours" of different parts of the city. It will be on display in the Tinkering Studio until the end of June!

tinkering.exploratorium.edu

Dutch To Build Solar Panels Into Their Roads, Starting With Bike Lanes

by Alex Davies

from http://www.treehugger.com/
solar-road-design.jpg

Copyright TNO 2011

The Dutch are well known for their ubiquitous bike lanes, to the point where Amsterdam is neck and neck with Copenhagen for the title of most bike-loving capital in Europe. Now, Denmark will have to come up with something big to match the latest plan from the Netherlands - the installation of solar panels in roads, starting with bike lanes.

Talk about the efficient use of space: if you're going to have roads (and hopefully you'll have bike lanes), why not put that space to work producing energy? Called the Solaroad, the project is the brainchild of Dutch research firm TNO. The idea is pretty straightforward: a layer of concrete forms the road itself. A centimeter thick layer of crystalline silicon solar cells is laid on top, and covered by a layer of toughened glass. The energy potential: 50kWh per square meter per year, which can then be used to power street lighting, traffic systems and households.

But it's still an idea in development, which is why TNO, working with the Province of North Holland, the consulting firm Ooms Averhorn Group and the tech firm Intech, is starting with a small-scale pilot program in the town of Krommenie, outside of Amsterdam. Scheduled for installation next year, the first Solaroad will hopefully allow its developers better implement many more throughout the country.

Maybe it'll even make it to the US one day- though in today's political climate, this probably costly project is unlikely to get much support in Congress. Well, we can dream.

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