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Monday, July 23, 2007

Shine On You Crazy Diamond

http://www.forbes.com/business/businesstech/2007/07/17/book-review-stumpf-oped-cx_avb_0718stumpf.html

Saving Neurons and Memories


A compound that's known to extend life span in worms and fish could also stop neuron damage and cognitive decline.

Physicians can treat the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders, but there is no way to prevent or reverse the underlying degeneration and death of neurons that characterize these diseases. Now research by scientists at Harvard and MIT suggests a potential new therapeutic approach.
The scientists have shown that a gene called SIRT1 and a plant compound found in red wine called resveratrol can protect against neuron degeneration in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The researchers demonstrated that activating SIRT1 and injecting resveratrol, which have both been previously associated with life-span extension in lower organisms, can also prevent cognitive problems in the mice.

http://www.technologyreview.com/Biotech/19080/

1,500 plus CPDRC inmates perform THRILLER

$100 laptop finally goes into production

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/6908946.stm

Female President Next for Fox's '24'

http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=D8QHT50G1&show_article=1&cat=0

Dirty Cart Art

http://www.dirtycarart.com.nyud.net:8080/gallery/

Funny Baby T-Shirts - hilarious

http://www.linkinn.com/_Funny_Baby_T_Shirts

Profiting from mortality- Death Bonds

Death bond is shorthand for a gentler term the industry prefers: life settlement-backed security. Whatever the name, it's as macabre an investing concept as Wall Street has ever cooked up. Some 90 million Americans own life insurance, but many of them find the premiums too expensive; others would simply prefer to cash in early. "Life settlements" are arrangements that offer people the chance to sell their policies to investors, who keep paying the premiums until the sellers die and then collect the payout. For the investors it's a ghoulish actuarial gamble: The quicker the death, the more profit is reaped. Most of the transactions are done by small local firms called life settlement providers, which in the past have typically sold the policies to hedge funds. Now, Wall Street sees huge profits in buying policies, throwing them into a pool, dividing the pool into bonds, and selling the bonds to pension funds, college endowments, and other professional investors. If the market develops as Wall Street expects, ordinary mutual funds will soon be able to get in on the action, too.

http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/07_31/b4044001.htm?chan=top+news_top+news+index_top+story

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