Zazzle Shop

Screen printing

Thursday, March 27, 2008

Gilly Hicks is the Thomas Pink of underwear stores

Chismillionaire stopped at the Natick Collection yesterday with Mrs. Chismillionaire and happened by this wonderful intimates store. Gilly Hicks was filled with cheery staff and an English Plantation style decor typical of all Abercrombie stores. There were many styles and cuts with tremendous color variety. If you have seen Thomas Pink tie displays you know what I am talking about.

Since Victoria's Secret has slipped towards the trashy side and targeted increasingly younger clientèle, they have lost some of their mystique in my opinion. Gilly is an answer towards the more conservative and playful Aerie by American Eagle. Far more classy and Cheekier as their marketing proclaims, Gilly Hicks offers us gentlemen a wonderful opportunity to purchase quality intimates for our ladies that offer a benefit for both parties without risk of offense from your significant other!

www.gillyhicks.com


No e commerce site yet, but that is due in early 2009.

McLaren F1 LM as incentive prize

1995_McLaren_F1_LM

Ron Dennis to give Hamilton a McLaren F1 LM, but only if...



Nate_Martinez
Posted Today 09:42 AM by Nate Martinez
Category: Motorsports, Industry News, Europe, Mercedes-Benz

Lewis Hamilton likely doesn't need another car, but we're pretty sure he'll want this one. In addition to the many luxury AMG models given to him by his team engine supplier Mercedes-Benz, McLaren Automotive has now promised to hand over the keys to one of their most prized possessions, a McLaren F1 LM, but not without a catch -- Hamilton must secure both the driver and construtor 2008 F1 World Championship titles.

1995_McLaren_F1_LM

According to UK's The Sun, Team McLaren's Principle Ron Dennis has promised Hamilton one of only five McLaren F1 LM editions, each valued at over $2 million for achieving the task at hand.

"If Lewis can win the two titles, the car is his. Fortunately, our deal gives me a bit of time to save up!", Dennis said jokingly.

The LM was constructed by McLaren Automotive to honor the five McLaren GTR's that finished the legendary Le Mans endurance race in 1995. All were painted in Bruce McLaren's trademark papaya orange racing color and feature a stripped out interior, shorter gearing, and enhanced aerodynamic and handling setups.

Oh, did we forget to mention that this F1 is a beast? With an unrestricted 680 bhp on tap coming from its BMW derived V-12, it rockets to 60 mph in 2.9 seconds and is so loud that its passengers have no choice but to communicate through radio headsets.

No wonder the bright orange McLaren F1 LM was Lewis' dream car at the early age of 13.

Now if we could only borrow it for a day of testing....

An Extremely Compelling "LOST" Theory


This guy may actually have it all figured out.

read more | digg story

Every Simpsons Couch Gag In Under 5 Minutes

wanted to embed Video, but it keeps playing automatically. Please click below to watch this!!

read more | digg story

Follow-up to Gary's Post: Tabletop tap tech begets bountiful beer

It's a beer lover's dream come true: a tap right at the table, with on-demand lager. No sitting around trying to flag a waitress for a refill. Just put your glass under the tap and milk it for all it's worth.

Johnny Crawford/STAFF

johnny.jpg

There's just one catch.

You're drinking on the meter and when the table hits the limit, the flow stops. At least temporarily.

Stats, a new downtown sports bar, spent $110,000 to install the system. The Table Tap technology lets guests serve themselves once waitresses check identifications and turn on a meter. The taps connect to 16 kegs in a basement cooler, and guests can pick which two they want hooked up at the table.

"I want one in my house," said Kevin McDonough of Sandy Springs, who was sipping on a pint of Harp that he'd poured himself./

The meters tick away suds by the ounce, with prices ranging from 25 cents to 37 cents. That amounts to $4 a pint for the least expensive beer.

When the table hits 180 ounces, the taps stop pouring until a server checks over the table

Table Tap founder Jeff Libby negotiated the limit with the Georgia Department of Revenue, settling on an amount equal to the largest pitchers in use at other restaurants. It's the same self-serve concept, he figured.

"You can't just sit here and endlessly pour beer," says Todd Rushing, a partner in Concentrics Restaurants.

At 180 ounces a table, that works out to 1 pint for 12 guests. Smaller groups could dream about sloshing over to Philips Arena, just a few hundred feet away.

Rushing is quick to say that Stats is positioning itself as a family-friendly place to draw visitors from the nearby Georgia Aquarium, and not the stereotypical sports bar where guys sit around and swill beer.

Still, the pour-your-own approach is much more appealing than scanning cereal through a self-serve checkout lane. Not just for drinkers, but for restaurateurs.

With meters on many of the taps, including at an upstairs bar, nobody gets a freebie.

With guests at seven tables and 10 private rooms free to pour their own, labor costs shrink.

And the technology is an exclusive for now, although Libby is preparing to sell Table Tap to other establishments now that Stats has opened.

But beer drinkers are still tasked with one thing to figure out on their own: How much do you tip if you're the one doing the ordering and pouring?

WEB PAGE HERE: TABLETAP

20+ Awesome Miniature Spy-Guns [PICS]


We wrote once about miniature spy cameras, now we are going to up the stakes. James Bond types not only need to inconspicuously take pictures, they also need to inconspicuously kill people. When given "license to kill", it's still better to do it with as little fuss as possible.

read more | digg story

Comcast Teams Up With BitTorrent and Promises Net Neutrality

Written by Ernesto on March 27, 2008

Comcast has announced that it will lift the ban on BitTorrent traffic, which prevented its users from sharing files using the popular protocol. The ISP and BitTorrent Inc. will work together on finding customer friendly solutions for the congestion allegedly caused by BitTorrent traffic.

comcastComcast has announced that it will stop targeting BitTorrent transfers and has said it will invest in its network capacity. For the time being the company will throttle users who use the most bandwidth, not all BitTorrent users per se.

Comcast’s chief technology officer Tony Warner said: “Rather than slow traffic by certain types of applications — such as file-sharing software or companies like BitTorrent — Comcast will slow traffic for those users who consume the most bandwidth.”

Comcast hoped it could quietly interfere with its customer’s BitTorrent activities without getting too much attention. Unfortunately for them, their actions didn’t go unnoticed, and during August last year we broke the news that this ISP does indeed mess with its customers internet connections.

Comcasts actions sparked the debate about what “reasonable” network management practices are, and this eventually resulted in a FCC hearing last month.

It now seems that Comcast saw the light, and wants to invest in more Internet gateway capacity after all. BitTorrent Inc. announced today that it will work together with the ISP to optimize their software, so that it puts less stress on the network.

Ashwin Navin, president of BitTorrent Inc. told TorrentFreak: “We are happy that Comcast is increasing the upload capacity on its network and that they will stop sending TCP resets to BitTorrent clients. We plan to jointly test how ISPs can better address the large volume of P2P traffic and share our research with all ISPs and application developers. This is a huge win for the Internet community as a whole.”

Still, Comcast will continue to throttle heavy users, who actually use the bandwidth that was promised to them in their contracts. It is to be expected that Comcast and other ISPs will have to step away from the all-you-can-eat plans they have been offering for years, now that people actually start to use bandwidth they signed up for.


Trippiest Twilight Zone Episode Becomes A Movie

A classic Twilight Zone episode written by Richard (I Am Legend) Matheson is getting a big-screen update called Countdown. The original episode, "Death Ship," is about three astronauts who arrive on an alien planet, only to find their own dead bodies, in a crashed version of their own ship. The movie version will be written and directed by Michael Brandt, co-writer of 3:10 To Yuma and the upcoming Wanted. Details (and spoilers) below.

Says Brandt:

Countdown is fantastic because it wraps the themes of fate and predestination in a movie that is really a giant puzzle (that will also) be fun for the audience to piece together... The updates that are successful - not just of this but of any of the great 1950s Sci-Fi concepts - are those that take the idea and bring a modern sensibility to it. When it misses sometimes, it's because people get caught up in the story from start to finish.
"Death Ship" was a short story by Matheson before he adapted it into a TV episode. In the famous TV version, after the astronauts discover their own wrecked ship and corpses, they reason that they've jumped forward in time and all they have to do is change their actions to avoid this fate. (Which could be the "predestination" stuff Brandt is talking about.) But there's also a lot of other stuff, including the astronauts seeing visions of their dead friends, and it's hinted that they may actually be dead already, and just seeing weird afterlife visions. The whole episode is up on YouTube.[SciFiNow]

Ads vs. Reality

Dr Pepper Will Give Everyone* in America a Free Soda.....




If Axl Rose Releases New Guns N' Roses Album, Chinese Democracy, In 2008

*Guitarists Slash and Buckethead Will Not Be Eligible For Free Soda

PLANO, Texas, March 26 /PRNewswire/ -- Tired of a world in which Americans idolize wannabe singers and musicals about high schoolers pass as rock 'n roll music, Dr Pepper is encouraging (ok, begging) Axl Rose to finally release his 17-year-in-the-making belabored masterpiece, Chinese Democracy, in 2008.

In an unprecedented show of solidarity with Axl, everyone in America, except estranged GNR guitarists Slash and Buckethead, will receive a free can of Dr Pepper if the album ships some time -- anytime! -- in 2008. Dr Pepper supports Axl, and fully understands that sometimes you have to make it through the jungle before you get it right.

"It took a little patience to perfect Dr Pepper's special mix of 23 ingredients, which our fans have come to know and love," said Jaxie Alt, director of marketing for Dr Pepper. "So we completely understand and empathize with Axl's quest for perfection -- for something more than the average album. We know once it's released, people will refer to it as "Dr Pepper for the ears" because it will be such a refreshing blend of rich, bold sounds -- an instant classic."

Show your support for Axl and get on the nightrain of encouragement at www.chinesedemocracywhen.blogspot.com -

About Dr Pepper

Dr Pepper is a leading brand in the beverage portfolio of Plano, Texas-based Cadbury Schweppes Americas Beverages (CSAB), a subsidiary division of Cadbury Schweppes plc . CSAB is one of the largest producers of soft drinks and premium beverages in the Americas. CSAB's brand portfolio includes Dr Pepper, 7UP, Snapple, Accelerade, Mott's Apple Juice and Sauce, RC Cola, A&W Root Beer, Sunkist Soda, Canada Dry, Hawaiian Punch, Schweppes, Diet Rite, Clamato, Mr & Mrs T Mixers, Holland House Mixers, Rose's, Mistic, Yoo-hoo, Orangina, IBC, Stewart's, Nantucket Nectars and other well-known consumer brands. For additional information on CSAB and its products, visit www.brandspeoplelove.com.


In search of the world's Top 5 glasses of water


In search of the world's Top 5 glasses of water
By Peter McMahon

How long has it been since you really enjoyed a glass of water?

Odds are, any number of things in your H2O (both better and worse for you than just regular water in its unspoiled state) have tainted your chance to experience this life-giving liquid at its best.

I recently had the chance to taste water at its most pure - straight from an iceberg - and it changed my outlook on it forever.

Inspired by that eye-opening glass, here - in my opinion - are the five best glasses of water on Earth:

5. Waste water never tasted so good

Folks in Sweden are so into water purification that Stockholm even has an annual water wastewater reclamation prize, offered up to the most deserving innovators. The city boasts a global reputation for doing things right when it comes to the environment.

From an area of the city that gets rid of its garbage and recycling through giant vacuum tubes and incinerators, to systems that recycle waste water to drink (from sinks, not the other place waste water comes from) the city has made some tough decisions to stick to a green agenda.

Having tasted this water (in regular and snazzy "sparkling" form), I can tell you it's tastier than anything I've ever had out of a tap before - Hints of charcoal, but that's maybe my reaction to a complete lack of fluoride or the bottled water I usually drink in Europe.

4. Tap water that doesn't offend

According to the Berkeley Springs International Water Tasting Awards (legitimately acknowledged as an authority on water taste), Clearbrook (near Abbotsford), British Columbia has the best-tasting tap water on Earth.

The BC town won the Virginia spa's annual world-wide water taste-off for 2008, along with the water district of Southern California.

3. Best spring water on Earth

Though some die-hard environmentalists consider bottled water a big no-no, we're talking taste here - and I can tell you that U.S.-based Tumai bottled water is the best-tasting liquid I have ever guzzled from a 500 ml prison of polycarbonate.

Gathered from a spring in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, this Martinsburg, West Virginia-based company has won several top prizes for taste in 2008. Its water is 100 per cent free of sodium and it shows in the taste.

What's more, the company donates 15 per cent of its proceeds to programs that better the quality of life for impoverished communities in Sub-Saharan-Africa.

2. Simulating a mineral spring in your kitchen

For years, I'd guzzled water from the cooler jug. Tastier than our rural tap water run though a filter, I was content to drink from the cooler at home and (ironically) from the tap at work (Toronto tap water is "quality filtered 300,000 times a year", after all.)

A few months ago, I was introduced to one of these new gravity water filtration systems, which allow clean water from any source to trickle through a series of mineral and ceramic filters, producing tasty, pathogen-free water.

What's most impressive is the taste, though - smooth with a hint of what tastes like a combination of clay mixed with mild vanilla - Totally weird but once you have a glass, you can't get enough.

A note on some of these gravity water systems - ours is a water-cooler-top model from Nikken: Some of these have been heralded lately as eco-snake-oil, offering few of the health benefits their packaging claims. However, none make the water any less safe than it started out and for taste alone, many are worth the price.

One of the more sensible and proven models is the British Berkefeld gravity water system from DoultonUSA. The sting of its $230 US price tag is softened a bit by the fact that it doesn't need any filters replaced for years at a time.

1. An iceberg in your glass

Early in the day, staff from The Norseman on Newfoundland's Northern Peninsula receive their regular chunk of ice from the north Atlantic, and allow some of it to melt into pitchers, with a few still-frozen chunks thrown in to keep things cold.

A meal at the restaurant is a tasty mix of local seafood and diner-theatre-style historical re-enactments courtesy of the kitchen staff.

All fine fare. But the water was the real show-stopper:

Never before had I wondered if water was supposed to taste different than the fluoride-sanitized stuff that flows from your tap, or the mineral-overtones of spring water. Until I tried iceberg water

This was "just" water - or about as close to just water as water had been since it first came into being during the formation of our solar system: Tasteless but somehow still satisfying.

Contrary to what you might think, there is absolutely no taste of salt in iceberg water. That's because ice freezes slowly enough to prevent any inclusion of salt in its complex crystal structure.

A life-changing experience to put on your wallet to-do-in-life list.

Cameras On Elephants' Trunks Show Jungle Secrets [PICS]


We revealed the amazing story of how four tiger cubs were captured on special cameras in logs carried by elephants - giving the most intimate insight into their early lives ever recorded. Now, we show for the first time other creatures of the jungle caught in this extraordinary - and pioneering - way.

read more | digg story

Absolutely Awesome tip to Fix Your Cellphone soaked in water


This is a brilliant tip...fix your costly cellphone which you have mistakingly soaked in water..you need to go to the kitchen to do that...yes...you heard it right

read more | digg story

Rough Morning

Yellow Card for Chis


gjblass posted on

Wednesday, February 20, 2008

New $5 Bill vs. Old $5 Bill

8 Healthy Reasons To Drink Beer


Fighting many of the diseases related to aging may be as simple as raising a glass.

read more | digg story

New $5 bill has entered circulation


A New $5 Bill Enters Circulation Today
Enhanced Security Features Are Easy to Check

The first new $5 bill was issued by the Federal Reserve today during a commemorative transaction at President Lincoln's Cottage at the Soldiers' Home in Washington, D.C., a historic site used by the former president as a White House summer retreat. Officials from the Federal Reserve Board, U.S. Treasury, Bureau of Engraving and Printing and U.S. Secret Service ushered the new $5 bill into circulation at the Lincoln Cottage gift shop.

Michael Lambert, Assistant Director, Division of Reserve Bank Operations and Payment Systems at the Federal Reserve Board, spent the first new $5 bill on a book of President Lincoln's speeches. President Lincoln’s portrait continues to be featured on this redesign of the $5 bill. "The redesigned $5 bill's enhanced security features help ensure we stay ahead of counterfeiters and protect your hard-earned money," Lambert said. "It only takes a few seconds to check the new $5 bill to make sure it's genuine. If you know how to check its security features, you can easily be confident it's real."

Today, Federal Reserve banks will begin distributing the redesigned $5 bills to customer banks, which will then distribute them to businesses and consumers. The new $5 bill designs will circulate first in the U.S. and gradually spread to other countries as international banks place orders for them from the Federal Reserve. You don't have to trade in your old bills for new ones. Both the new $5 bills and the older-design $5 bills will continue to maintain their full face value.

The new $5 bill incorporates state-of-the-art security features that are easy to use by cash handlers and consumers alike. Hold the bill to the light to check for these features:

Watermarks: There are now two watermarks on the redesigned $5 bill. A large number "5" watermark is located in a blank space to the right of the portrait replacing the previous watermark portrait of President Lincoln found on the older-design $5 bills. A second watermark -- a column of three smaller “5”s -- has been added to the new $5 bill design and is positioned to the left of the portrait.
Security Thread: The embedded security thread runs vertically and is now located to the right of the portrait on the redesigned $5 bill. The letters "USA" followed by the number "5" in an alternating pattern are visible along the thread from both sides of the bill. The thread glows blue when held under ultraviolet light.

President Lincoln's Cottage at the Soldiers' Home in Washington, D.C. (http://www.lincolncottage.org/ Leaving the Board), which has recently been restored and is now open to the public, was chosen as the location to spend the first new $5 bill because of its historic significance to President Lincoln, the subject of the bill's portrait. President Lincoln established the United States Secret Service the same evening he was assassinated and made safeguarding the nation's currency from counterfeiters the agency's primary mission.

Every person or business that gets a counterfeit bill experiences a real economic loss, and in 2007, $61.4 million in counterfeit money was passed in the United States. "Everyone who uses U.S. currency is on the front line of defense against counterfeiters," said Michael Merritt, Deputy Assistant Director, U.S. Secret Service. "The best way to protect yourself is to learn the security features. It’s simple, it’s quick, and it can save you from accepting a fake."

Treasurer of the United States Anna Escobedo Cabral encouraged businesses and individuals to visit www.moneyfactory.gov/newmoney to order or download educational materials about the new $5 bill and other recently redesigned currency, including the $10, $20 and $50 bills. "Each time we introduce a new bill, we provide the information businesses and individuals need to empower themselves -- to learn how to use the security features and verify that a bill is genuine."

Free educational materials are available to businesses, financial institutions, trade and professional associations, citizen groups and individuals to prepare cash handlers and consumers to recognize the new design and protect themselves against counterfeits. Since 2003, the U.S. government has distributed about 80 million pieces of public education and training materials about the new $5, $10, $20 and $50 bill redesigns. Materials are available to order or download in multiple languages at www.moneyfactory.gov/newmoney.

Manufacturers and users of cash-handling equipment are also an important audience for education about new currency designs. "Because the $5 bill is used so heavily in vending, self-service and transit farecard machines, we began working with the manufacturers of those and other cash-oriented machines in 2006 to make sure they had enough time to make the necessary adjustments that would allow for their machines to accept the new $5 bill," said Pamela Gardiner, Deputy Director of the Treasury’s Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

As with the redesigned $10, $20 and $50 bills that preceded it, the new $5 bill features an American symbol of freedom printed in the background. The Great Seal of the United States, featuring an eagle and shield, is printed in purple on the front of the bill. Additional design elements include:

•The large, easy-to-read number "5" in the lower right corner on the back of the bill, which helps those with visual impairments distinguish the denomination, has been enlarged in the new $5 bill design and is printed in high-contrast purple ink.
•The oval borders around President Lincoln's portrait on the front and the Lincoln Memorial vignette on the back have been removed. Both engravings have been enhanced.
•Small yellow "05"s are printed to the left of the portrait on the front of the bill and to the right of the Lincoln Memorial vignette on the back.

The new $5 bill's most noticeable design difference is the addition of light purple in the center of the bill, which blends into gray near the edges. Because color can be duplicated, consumers and cash-handlers should use the key security features – on the new $5 bill, the watermarks and security thread – not color, to check the authenticity of paper money.

Note to Editors: Given President Lincoln’s ties to the state of Illinois, the Federal Reserve Banks of St. Louis and Chicago will commemorate the $5 day of issue with a teacher training workshop and youth education event at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in Springfield, Illinois. The event is in cooperation with the Illinois Council on Economic Education and the purpose is to educate teachers and students more about the new $5 bill, President Lincoln and the Federal Reserve. For more information, please call Joseph Elstner, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis at 314-444-4892 or David Blanchette, Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum at 217-558-0516.

TikiBar TV

Honestly, if you're not watching this web tv show there is something wrong with you. What's not to like? Humor, great production value (for a web show), a good looking girl, and BOOZE! Add to that, I think they are genuinely drunk for most of the episodes and as a bonus, you get a drink recipe every time! They also tend to skew some of their humor towards the "geekier" side of things as evidenced by the "special guest" in this episode. Digg it!



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