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Friday, November 14, 2008

ICON Aircraft

Sport Flying Revolution...







The sport is back in flying…


The Sport Flying revolution has just begun. In 2004, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), working closely with the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) created what has been called “The biggest change in aviation in 50 years.” They created an entirely new category of aircraft (Light Sport Aircraft) as well as a new category of pilot license (Sport Pilot), both aimed specifically at consumer recreational flying. Now, the dream of flight is more accessible and more affordable than ever before. Satisfy your sense of adventure… It’s time to join the ICON revolution.


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Moraine Lake...Just the Perfect Place for an Epic Canoe Ride



flickr.com — Moraine Lake is a glacially fed lake in Banff National Park, 14 kilometres outside the Village of Lake Louise, Alberta, Canada. It is situated in the Valley of the Ten Peaks, at an elevation of approximately 6183 feet (1884 m). The lake has a surface area of 0.5 km. Banff is really worth visiting, its just a gorgeous place for a lazy canoe ride.

WIKI Moraine Lake

http://www.morainelake.com/

Gas prices dip below $2 in Boston


Samia Letaief, Reginald Ellis, and Edward Baez, were happy with the gas prices today at Hatoff's in Jamaica Plain.

By Martin Finucane, Globe Staff

Yes, you can believe your eyes. Gas prices under $2 per gallon have arrived in Boston.

Customers at Hatoff’s on Washington Street in Jamaica Plain welcomed the station’s price of $1.99.9 this afternoon.

“It really feels good,” said Marc Millien, 31, of Dorchester. “It’s a big surprise. ... I hope it goes down more.”

“It’s been forever,” said Samia Letaief, 46, of Hyde Park. “It really has.”

Gas prices around the state have been dropping down to just above $2 a gallon, according to massachusettsgasprices. com. And dozens of stations -- many in the southeastern portion of the state -- have begun offering gas below $2.

Stations in Brockton, Taunton and Whitman, as well as North Andover are offering gas today for as low as $1.93 per gallon, according to the website.

In Boston, the website lists Hatoff’s and stations in Dorchester, Brighton, and West Roxbury as dropping below that magical $2 mark.

The prices are a far cry from the average high of $4.09 for the Boston area recorded in July by AAA of Southern New England.

The dropping prices come at a good time, people at Hatoff’s said, with the economy in turmoil.

“I’m unemployed right now,” said Reginal Ellis, 51, of Boston. “So this is really good.”

13 Eco-Friendly Tips for a Greener Thanksgiving

by Kristen Banker on November 12, 2008

Thanksgiving is a great time to go green. The season of Thanksgiving is about celebrating the earth and what it has to offer us, so respecting the environment is a great way to send the planet an eco-friendly thank-you.

Using eco-friendly products, reducing, reusing and recycling during Thanksgiving can help diminish waste to the environment. An eco conscious Thanksgiving will enrich your family’s holiday experience, because you’ll know you have helped reduce the impact on the environment, something we all should be thankful for. Here are a few tips for having a green Thanksgiving.

  1. When running around picking up all your necessities for the big day, make sure you bring along reusable bags. See if you can reduce the amount of waste you produce by buying only as much as you need and choosing products that come in packaging that can be recycled.
    Reusable Shopping Bags

    Reusable Shopping Bags

  2. Buy locally grown food. It’s a great way to have a green Thanksgiving. Locally grown is generally organic and therefore good for your health and the environment. It requires less fuel to reach local store shelves which saves on fuel. It also contributes more to your local economy by supporting the local farmers and merchants. Foodroutes can help you find local merchants in your area.
  3. Buy organic fruits, vegetable, (apples and potatoes are very high on the pesticide hit list, and retain huge amounts of the chemicals sprayed on them), and grains grown without chemical pesticides and fertilizers. Organic farming also increases soil fertility, prevents erosion, and is more cost-effective for farmers.
  4. If you’re having Turkey as part of your dinner, search the Eat Well Guide. You can find types of meat by production methods, and locations where you can purchase an organic turkey. The “production methods” section allows you to select items labeled 100% vegetarian fed, grass fed, free-range, non-confined, no antibiotics, organic, etc. You can also contact your local grocery store and ask if they carry turkeys labeled “American Humane Certified,” or “USDA Certified Organic.”
  5. Lift a glass of organic or biodynamic wine, (in recycled glasses of course), and give thanks to sustainability. Serve organic wine with “real” corks not plastic or twist off tops. Your eco-friendly Thanksgiving party can help preserve the cork industry.
    Protect Our Earth Glasses

    Protect Our Earth Glasses

  6. If you have to fly for the holidays, purchase carbon credits at Carbon Planet to offset your portion of the carbon dioxide emissions generated by your flight. A typical long-haul flight produces nearly four tons of carbon dioxide.
  7. Plant a Tree as part of the family affair. Trees absorb carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas that contributes to the greenhouse effect and global warming. By planting one tree, in one year, that tree will absorb roughly 26 pounds of carbon dioxide and return enough oxygen to supply a family of four. The Plant-A-Tree-Today (PATT) Foundation was formed with its mission to react to problems caused by the massive and increasing levels of deforestation worldwide. Help raise awareness of environmental issues and the role forests play, take action against climate change, educate children on these issues and to Plant a tree this Thanksgiving.
  8. Keep your thermostat at an acceptable setting, and start a fire in your fireplace to keep warm. If you normally keep your temperature at 74 degrees Fahrenheit, try lowering it two degrees on Thanksgiving. This will conserve extra energy.
  9. Nature always decorates best, especially this time of year as the trees shed their brightly colored leaves. Take a nature walk and gather signs of the season from your local environment to create a simple, beautiful harvest centerpiece. With a little imagination, you can make great eco-friendly Thanksgiving decorations and have a lot of fun in the process. Gather found items such as pinecones, colored leaves, seedpods, branches and colorful berries and leaves. Place your treasures in recycled vases or bowls for a naturally green centerpiece.
  10. Decorate your table with beeswax candles rather than petroleum-derived paraffin candles. The beeswax is not only healthier for you and the planet, but it smells better too! For an extra touch, fill a recycled glass bowl with seasonal grains, (such as corn), and place a pillar, (soy or beeswax), candle in the center.
    Early Bird Candle

    Early Bird Candle

  11. All flowers remind us of nature’s bounty, but not all flower companies are eco-friendly. Most spray their crops with heavy amounts of pesticides. Order a gorgeous Thanksgiving centerpiece from Organic Bouquet. They’ll give ten percent of your purchase to The Nature Conservancy, and send your flowers in biodegradable, corn-based flower sleeves. Head to your pantry for empty containers such as seltzer bottles, spice jars, wine bottles, cans, etc. to use as vases for your flower arrangements.
  12. Purchase recycled paper products, if you need to have disposable plates and cups. Otherwise, use regular plates and cups that can be washed so you don’t produce any waste.
  13. Try and cook just the right amount of food for your family and friends because nothing is worse than wasted food. However, if you have too much food, send your guests home with a doggie bag. You can also donate leftover food to a local shelter or food bank. Mahalo can help you with this.

Sustainable Agriculture Chardonnay 2006

Sustainable Agriculture Chardonnay 2006

Whatever else you do on Thanksgiving, make it a time to say thank you to the people in your life who matter most. Many of the best moments in life are those spent with friends and family. As part of your eco-friendly Thanksgiving, give thanks to the many ways the environment sustains and enriches our lives.

First Photos of Planets Around Other Stars

By Jeanna Bryner, Senior Writer

This 3D representation of the three planets orbiting the star HR 8799 shows the system is located 90 degrees away from the Milky Way galactic center, lower than the sun. (All orbital diameters are greatly exaggerated.) Credit: 2MASS/UMass/IPAC-Caltech/NASA/NSF

Astronomers have taken what they say are the first-ever direct images of planets outside of our solar system, including a visible-light snapshot of a single-planet system and an infrared picture of a multiple-planet system.

Earth-like worlds might also exist in the three-planet system, but if so they are too dim to photograph. The other newfound planet orbits a star called Fomalhaut, which is visible without the aid of a telescope. It is the 18th brightest star in the sky.

The massive worlds, each much heftier than Jupiter (at least for the three-planet system), could change how astronomers define the term "planet," one planet-hunter said.

Breakthrough technology

The three exoplanets (red dots in the right panel) are shown orbiting HR 8799, whose residual light is shown as the multi-colored specks in the center of the right panel. An infrared image of one of the planets, which lies at 38 AU from the star, is shown in the right panel. Credit: National Research Council Canada.

Until now, scientists have inferred the presence of planets mainly by detecting an unseen world's gravitational tug on its host star or waiting for the planet to transit in front of its star and then detecting a dip in the star's light. While these methods have helped to identify more than 300 extrasolar planets to date, astronomers have struggled to actually directly image and see such inferred planets.

The four photographed exoplanets are discussed in two research papers published online today by the journal Science.

"Every extrasolar planet detected so far has been a wobble on a graph. These are the first pictures of an entire system," said Bruce Macintosh, an astrophysicist from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, and part of the team that photographed the multi-planet system in infrared light. "We've been trying to image planets for eight years with no luck and now we have pictures of three planets at once."

Astronomers have claimed previously to have directly imaged a planet, with at least two such objects, though not everybody agreed the objects were planets. Instead, they may be dim, failed stars known as brown dwarfs.

Multi-planet snapshots

Macintosh, lead researcher Christian Marois of the NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics in Canada, and colleagues used the Gemini North telescope and W.M. Keck Observatory on Hawaii's Mauna Kea to obtain infrared images. Infrared radiation represents heat and, along with everything from radio waves to visible light and X-rays, is part of the electromagnetic spectrum.

The trio of worlds orbits a star named HR 8799, which is about 130 light-years away in the constellation Pegasus and about 1.5 times as massive as the sun. The planets are located at distances from their star of 24, 38 and 68 astronomical units (AU). (An astronomical unit equals the average Earth-sun distance of 93 million miles, or about 150 million km.) Other planet-finding techniques work out to only about 5 AU from a star.

The planet closest to the star weighs in at 10 times the mass of Jupiter, followed by another 10 Jupiter-mass planet and then, farther out, a world seven times the heft of Jupiter.

By astronomical standards, the planets are fresh out of the oven, forming about 60 million years ago. That means the orbs are still glowing from heat leftover from their formation. Earth, by comparison, is about 4.5 billion years old.

The most distant planet orbits just inside a disk of dusty debris, similar to that produced by the icy objects of the solar system's Kuiper belt, which lies just beyond the orbit of Neptune.

The setup of this planetary system, along with its dusty belt, suggests it is a scaled-up version of our solar system, Macintosh said. That means other planets closer in to the host star could be waiting for discovery.

"I think there's a very high probability that there are more planets in the system that we can't detect yet," Macintosh said. "One of the things that distinguishes this system from most of the extrasolar planets that are already known is that HR 8799 has its giant planets in the outer parts — like our solar system does — and so has 'room' for smaller terrestrial planets, far beyond our current ability to see, in the inner parts."

Hubble's discovery

The HR 8799 planetary system (shown as an artist's conception) resembles a scaled-up version of the outer portion of the solar system, according to the researchers, who estimate the planets orbit their star at distances similar to those of Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Credit: Gemini Observatory; Artwork by Lynette Cook

University of California, Berkeley, astronomer Paul Kalas led the team of astronomers who took the visible-light snapshot of the single-planet system. The exoplanet has been named Fomalhaut b, and is estimated to weigh no more than three Jupiter masses.

The Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys was used to make the image. The camera is equipped with a coronagraph that blocks out the light of the host star, allowing astronomers to view a much fainter planet.

"It's kind of like if driving into the sun and suddenly you flip down your visor, you can see the road easier," Kalas said during a telephone interview. In fact, Fomalhaut b is 1 billion times fainter than its star. "It's not easy to see. That kind of sensitivity has never been seen before," he added.

Fomalhaut b is about 25 light-years from Earth. Photos taken in 2004 and 2006 show the planet's movement over a 21-month period and suggest the planet likely orbits its star Fomalhaut every 872 years at a distance of 119 astronomical units (AU), or 11 billion miles (nearly 18 billion km). That's about four times the distance between Neptune and the sun.

Kalas suspected the planet's existence in 2004 (published in 2005) after Hubble images he had taken revealed a dusty belt that had a sharp inner edge around Fomalhaut. The sculpted nature of the ring suggested a planet in an elliptical orbit was shaping the belt's inner edge. And it was.

"The gravity of Fomalhaut b is the key reason that the vast dust belt surrounding Fomalhaut is cleanly sculpted into a ring and offset from the star," Kalas said. "We predicted this in 2005, and now we have the direct proof."

Kalas' team also suspects that the planet could be surrounded by a ring system with the dimensions of Jupiter's early rings, before the dust and debris coalesced into the four Galilean moons.

What's a planet?

This 2006 Hubble Space Telescope optical image shows the belt of dust and debris (bright oval) surrounding the star Fomalhaut and the planet (inset) that orbits the star every 872 years and sculpts the inner edge of the belt. Credit: Paul Kalas/UC Berkeley; STScI

The successful image results could change how planets are defined, said Sara Seager, an astrophysicist at MIT who was not involved in the discoveries.

Until now, mass has been one of the critical pieces of information that could place an object into or out of the planet club. Objects that are too massive, above about 13 Jupiter masses, are considered brown dwarfs. But now formation could also be part of the formula. Both of the new planetary systems revealed dusty disks and suggest the planets must have formed similar to how planets in our solar system and elsewhere are thought to have formed.

So, most astronomers would call the four objects planets, although their masses are only inferred from the luminosities seen in the images.

"Taken together, these discoveries are going to change what we call a planet," Seager told SPACE.com. "Until now people have been arguing about how big can an object be and still be a planet."

Seager added, referring to the multi-planet system, "People want to call the upper mass 12 Jupiter masses. I think it's going to force us to reconsider what a planet is, because even if they are more massive than what we want to call a planet, they're in a disk." In addition, she said, nobody has ever spotted three stars orbiting a host star, as would have to be the case if you were to call the three planets something other than planets.

Aiming for Earth-like planets

These recent direct images reveal giant, gaseous exoplanets in a new light for the first time, revealing not the effects of the planets but the planets themselves. The next goal would be direct images of an Earth-like planet, the astronomers say.

"The discovery of the HR 8799 system is a crucial step on the road to the ultimate detection of another Earth," Macintosh said.

The problem is that terrestrial (Earth-like) planets are orders of magnitude fainter than the giant Jupiter-like worlds, and they are much closer in to their host stars. That means the glare from the star would be overwhelming with today's technology.

The pay-off could be big, though, as such rocky planets could orbit within their habitable zones (where temperatures would allow the existence of liquid water).

"There is plenty of empty space between Fomalhaut b and the star for other planets to happily reside in stable orbits," Kalas said. "We'll probably have to wait for the James Webb Space Telescope to give us a clear view of the region closer to the star where a planet could host liquid water on the surface."

Air Art


Air Art from flip on Vimeo.
Airship Regatta in Friedrichshafen, Germany.
Fin-Fish by LaChLuVe, Empa Dübendorf, Switzerland

Todd Marinovich's brother hopes the smoking business goes a little better for him

The partially-bearded young man on the left is Mikhail Marinovich, 20, Syracuse defensive end and younger brother of the infamous Todd Marinovich. On the right, Niko Rechul, 21, native German, economics and finance double major and Syracuse punter. They're enjoying the fruits of their spanking new business venture in the 'Cuse, Hollywood Hookah, which opened Thursday.

It's not only a) The only athlete-owned business of which I'm aware among major college football players (since they put Jimmy Johns out of commission, anyway), but also b) Probably the only college-run venture of any kind to get written up Thursday for The New York Times. With all the hookah-smoking, college football-loving, upstate-traveling Times readers, that's got to be good for business.

It also helps that Rechul and Marinovich are hookah enthusiasts (for tobacco only, of course, fine, flavorful Al Fakher Shisha and nothing else, ever). They conceived the idea in a bowling alley over the summer. Three months and another wayward football season later, the dream of providing flavored tobacco for young adults to suck into their lungs is a reality. Lord knows how he has time, energy or money to pull this off (unless Syracuse has just quit practicing altogether, which would explain a lot, actually), but by owning a business -- any business -- Mikhail automatically assumes the role of "responsible son" among the offspring of ex-USC star Marv Marinovich, whose notorious efforts to engineer Todd into the perfect quarterback sort of, you know, backfired in the form of a half-dozen arrests for possession of marijuana, cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine and another for sexual assault since his senior year at USC in 1991.

Marv seems to have had a lighter tough with Mikhail -- the Daily reports the younger Marinovich has been visiting hookah bars since he was 16, whereas Todd couldn't so much as lay eyes on a grain of sugar -- and I would think holding down a job involving (presumably) legal substances and a title above "anarchist" puts him well above the bar. I mean, there was the arrest for breaking into an equipment room with another teammate back in March, but clearly he's turned a corner, right?

Artificial diamonds - now available in extra large

by Catherine Brahic

The CVD diamond in the centre has not been annealed, the ones to the left and right have (Image: Hemley /PNAS)

The CVD diamond in the centre has not been annealed, the ones to the left and right have (Image: Hemley /PNAS)


Diamonds are a girl's best friend, they say - and soon they could be every girl's best friend.

A team in the US has brought the world one step closer to cheap, mass-produced, perfect diamonds. The improvement also means there is no theoretical limit on the size of diamonds that can be grown in the lab.

A team led by Russell Hemley, of the Carnegie Institute of Washington, makes diamonds by chemical vapour deposition (CVD), where carbon atoms in a gas are deposited on a surface to produce diamond crystals.

The CVD process produces rapid diamond growth, but impurities from the gas are absorbed and the diamonds take on a brownish tint.

These defects can be purged by a costly high-pressure, high-temperature treatment called annealing. However, only relatively small diamonds can be produced this way: the largest so far being a 34-carat yellow diamond about 1 centimetre wide.

Microwaved gems

Now Hemley and his team have got around the size limit by using microwaves to "cook" their diamonds in a hydrogen plasma at 2200 °C but at low pressure. Diamond size is now limited only by the size of the microwave chamber used.

"The most exciting aspect of this new annealing process is the unlimited size of the crystals that can be treated. The breakthrough will allow us to push to kilocarat diamonds of high optical quality," says Hemley's Carnegie Institute colleague Ho-kwang Mao.

"The microwave unit is also significantly less expensive than a large high-pressure apparatus," adds Yufei Meng, who also participated in the experiments.

The new technique is so efficient that the synthetic diamonds contain fewer impurities than those found in nature, says Meng. "We once sent one of our lab-grown diamonds for jewellery identification, it wasn't told apart from natural ones," she says.

One immediate application will be to make ultra-high quality windows that are optically transparent to lasers.

Threat to commerce

The team's method "could be routinely run in any laboratory where it is needed," says Alexandre Zaitsev, a physicist at the City University of New York, whose work also includes diamonds. "When considered in combination with the high-growth-rate technique of CVD diamonds, it seems to be a starting point of mass-scale production of perfect diamond material at a low price."

Zaitsev considers low-pressure annealing at temperatures greater than 2000 °C to be a "breakthrough in diamond research and technology".

The improving quality of synthetic diamonds threatens the natural diamond market. While 20 tonnes of natural diamonds are mined annually, some 600 tonnes of synthetic diamonds are produced each year for industrial use alone.

They are used in a range of high-end technologies, such as lasers and high-pressure anvils. Some companies have also started to sell synthetic diamonds as gemstones. In response, diamond giant De Beers has set up a "Gem Defensive Programme" with the aim of finding ways to tell apart synthetic and natural diamonds.

Journal reference: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0808230105)

Strange Brew: Five unusual beers you gotta try


1.) THE MOST POTENT:
Sam Adams Utopias

At 50 proof, this brew is ranked by Guinness World Records as the world's strongest beer. With no carbonation and a malty, maple-syrup flavor that's similar to that of port wine, it's more like a fine sipping liqueur than a chuggable beer.



2.) THE SPICIEST: Cave Creek Chili Beer
With a real chili pepper in each bottle, this Arizona brew is hot. More of a novelty beer, it will burn a hole in your stomach if you drink more than one or two.




3.) THE MOST UN-BEERLIKE: Lindemans Kriek Cherry Lambic
This dark red, Belgian beer is almost like a cherry soda: sweet, highly carbonated, and distinctly cherry-flavored. But it still has that dry under-taste that lets you know it's a beer.



4.) BEER WITH A KICK: Dogfish Head Chicory Stout
Remember when Drew Carey created Buzz beer, a mix of coffee and beer? The brewing world took note and came out with this Delaware stout. Made with roasted chicory, organic Mexican coffee, and licorice root, this brew is rich and spiced, with a definite coffee aftertaste and even a hint of cloves.



5.) JUST PLAIN UNIQUE: Rogue Chipotle Ale
From the home of the brewpub, this Oregon ale is made with chipotle chilies for a smoky, slightly bitter flavor. You barely taste the chipotle . . . at first. Just wait—you get a nice little kick about five seconds after you swallow.

This Massive Glacier in Norway is So Damn Awesome..



upload.wikimedia.org — Briksdalsbreen (The Briksdal glacier) is one of the most accessible and best known arms of the Jostedalsbreen, the biggest glacier in continental Europe. It is situated in the county Sogn og Fjordane at the west coast of southern Norway. The size of Briksdalsbreen is not only depending on temperature. Yes, those are people in the lower-left!

Breakthrough drug restores white hair to its original color

By Fiona Macrae

In a discovery that could brighten up the lives of millions, scientists have created a drug that restores white hair to its natural colour.

They hope the drug, converted into a shampoo, could eventually be used as an alternative to dyes to hide greying locks.

The drug was found to trigger the production of pigmentation in hair samples tested in a lab.

Hair

Miracle cure: Scientists are working on a drug which reverts hair to its original colour

These pigments restored the hair to its original colour, from the white or grey it had become.

This took place no matter what the hair colour was to begin with.

The drug, known only as K(D)PT, increased pigmentation when it was applied to hairs gleaned from women undergoing facelifts.

However, it was effective only when the strands had been pre-treated to mimic the damage found in conditions that cause hair loss, including some forms of alopecia.

In such conditions, hair that grows back is often white.

Researcher Dr Ralf Paus, of the Manchester University and the University of Lubeck in Germany, said the drug ‘deserved to be explored as an innovative new anti-greying agent’.

Writing in the British Journal of Dermatology, he added: ‘Specifically, topical application of K(D)PT may become exploitable for the treatment of post-inflammatory hair whitening that is often seen during the recovery phase of alopecia areata.’

Nina Goad, of the British Association for Dermatologists, described the study as ‘an important step’.

She added: ‘It is important to note this is laboratory research and not yet ready for use on patients.

‘However, while the research is still at a very early stage, these findings could potentially pave the way for new therapies that restore colour to white hair.’

Philip Schofield

Back to his roots?: Using the new drug, TV presenter Phillip Schofield could turn his white hair back to dark brown

The researchers believe there is also ‘a reasonable possibility’ that hair turned grey by ageing would also respond.

The preliminary nature of the work means it is not possible to say if the drug would fully restore hair to its natural colour, although this could well be the case.

It is likely the treatment, which would have to be reapplied regularly, would work for men and women.

The synthetic hormone in the drug could only be used on lab hair samples. It is not yet ready to be applied directly to a patient’s head.

Man Climbs To Top Of Sears Tower 4 Times In One Day

Sears Tower shoes

Nick Wirsching wore these Crocs for his feet, and for his feat. (Tribune photo by Alex Garcia / November 11, 2008)

Next time you find yourself grumbling about a broken elevator, consider Nick Wirsching.


On Sunday, the 22-year-old West Chicago man climbed the stairs at the Sears Tower four times—that's 8,436 steps —voluntarily.

The feat set a record for the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, which hosts the Go Vertical Chicago event every year as a cancer research fundraiser.

"It's an extreme event," said Katie Levine, director of development for the foundation. "But he wasn't out of breath, he wasn't winded."

Wirsching—an extreme sports lover who has jumped into frigid Lake Michigan with a polar bear club and traveled from Chicago to Mackinac Island by sailboat—says he did the 103 flights once and decided to just keep going.

"I climbed to the top and thought, 'You know, really, I've got nothing else to do," said Wirsching, who took the elevator down.

And guess what? He did all four climbs wearing Crocs.

Bruins First in Conference

The Bruins beat their long time rivals the Montreal Canadiens last night to maintain their lead in the Eastern Conference. But to say they beat them would not be doing justice to the Bruins. They humiliated them with a 6 to 1 win, scoring the first three goals in the first period. But what makes it more remarkable is that they had played a late game in Chicago the night before that went into OT and wound up in a shoot out. Their plane landed at Hanscom Airport at 3:30 am the next morning. The Canadiens spent the night before in Boston and were able to get a good nights rest.

Here is a an example of the pluck and determination shown by this great team. Milan Lucic had scored a goal moments before this clip. Evidently Komisarek had had enough...



I know it is early in the season, but I am seeing great things ahead this year.

Concert Vault for the iPhone!

Concert Vault for the iPhone! Concert Vault for the iPhone!
Wolfgang's Vault is proud to announce Concert Vault for the iPhone and iPod Touch! Now you can listen to your favorite concerts, radio stations or search our complete archives from anywhere -- all your playlists and favorite concerts playing right on your iPhone or iPod Touch. And the best part is it's free!
About the Concert Vault App
Available Now

14 Photography Masters

paulo - 11/13/2008

Since the very beginning of Abduzeedo, our team has been bringing cool photography inspiration for you. We've featured many awesome photographers, from the ones with innovative techniques to oldschool guys, and all that. And today we've made a list. We love lists. :)

From classic Alberto Korda to hyped Dave Hill, our list actually ins't that long, but we've tried to remember the photographers that inspired us in some way... and at the end, the magic number was 14. Of course there are more photo masters out there, and we wish to hear from you. Do you know a Photography Master we've missed? Drop a comment! Hope you all enjoy our selection! Cheers! ;)

Pouya Dianat








Click here for the rest....AMAZING PICS.....

Presidential Shocker.............WTF




President George W. Bush poses with members of the Arizona State University Men's and Women's Track Team Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2008, during a photo opportunity with 2008 NCAA Sports Champions at the White House. White House photo by Eric Draper
President George W. Bush poses with members of the Arizona State University Men's and Women's Track Team Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2008, during a photo opportunity with 2008 NCAA Sports Champions at the White House. White House photo by Eric Draper Full Story


Different names for the shocker

Wiki on the Shocker

Chris Elliot's Daughter Joins SNL

Abby Elliott, Michaela Watkins join 'SNL'

Snlelliott Snlwatkins

Abby Elliott (left) and Michaela Watkins join "SNL" this Saturday. NBC photos

“Saturday Night Live,” feeling the loss of Tina Fey and now Amy Poehler, has added two women to its roster—Abby Elliott and Michaela Watkins.

“SNL” bypassed Second City to find the pair, instead dipping into the talent pools of the Upright Citizens Brigade Theater and the Groundlings Theater.

Snlmichaela Elliott, the daughter of onetime Letterman sidekick Chris Elliott and granddaughter of veteran comic Bob Elliott (of “Bob and Ray” fame), is from Wilton, Conn. She worked at the improv theater founded by Poehler, L.A.’s Upright Citizens Brigade Theater. She also trained at the Groundlings Theater in L.A. According to reports, she does impressions of Drew Barrymore and Chicagoan Joan Cusack.

Michaela Watkins was born in Syracuse, N.Y., and raised in Boston, NBC says. She is a Groundlings Theater alum as well, and has appeared on CBS’ sitcom “The New Adventures of Old Christine,” where she played Matthew’s girlfriend (right).

Will "SNL" continue to pull in ratings now that it's without Tina Fey's Sarah Palin? Can they bring the funnies like Poehler? Tune in Saturday, when both women debut, Paul Rudd hosts and Beyonce performs.

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VIDEO: SNL's TOP 12 POLITICAL IMPERSONATIONS

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